Articles on Antarctica

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Since the last ice age, the ice sheet retreated over a thousand kilometres in the Ross Sea region, more than any other region on the continent. Rich Jones

New research shows that Antarctica’s largest floating ice shelf is highly sensitive to warming of the ocean

New research shows that ocean and air temperatures both contributed to the melting of Antarctica's Ross Ice Shelf in the past, but melting from below by a warming ocean became more important over time.
One of two underwater gliders is deployed from a research ship into Antarctic waters. NOAA

Waiting for an undersea robot in Antarctica to call home

Sending autonomous vehicles to the Southern Ocean can be fraught with anxiety, especially if one of them doesn't make radio contact when it's supposed to.
Sea ice responds to changes in winds and ocean currents, sometimes with origins thousands of kilometres away. NASA/Nathan Kurtz

Why Antarctica’s sea ice cover is so low (and no, it’s not just about climate change)

Antarctic sea ice cover fell to an all-time low recently and hasn't yet recovered. Why? The initial answers could lie in an unlikely place – the tropics.
Brazil, home to the Amazon, is one of just five ‘mega-wilderness’ countries. CIFOR

Earth’s wilderness is vanishing, and just a handful of nations can save it

More than two-thirds of Earth's remaining wilderness is in the hands of just five countries, according to a new global map. A concerted conservation effort is needed to save our last wild places.
Aerial shot shot of the rectangular iceberg found off the Larsen 3 ice shelf. Jeremy Harbeck/AAP

How a near-perfect rectangular iceberg formed

Geometric icebergs can form around Antarctica, although such a perfect rectangle is unusual.
In contrast to common perceptions, Antarctic seafloor communities are highly diverse. This image shows a deep East Antarctic reef with plenty of corals, sponges and brittlestars. Can you spot the octopus? Australian Antarctic Division

Antarctic seas host a surprising mix of lifeforms – and now we can map them

Life on the Antarctic seafloor is surprisingly diverse – and half of the species live nowhere else on Earth. Now scientists can accurately map this unique biodiversity.

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