Articles on Civil war

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Despite voter dissatisfaction with the Republican and Democratic parties, they are likely to persist. Shutterstock/Victor Moussa

The two-party system is here to stay

Despite the fact that only 38% of Americans say they think the Democratic and Republican parties are doing 'an adequate job,' they're unlikely to disappear.
Christmas tours to mansions often present a ‘magical’ experience to tourists, but they ignore the realities of the lives of slaves who worked there. Shreveport-Bossier Convention and Tourist Bureau/Flickr

Slave life’s harsh realities are erased in Christmas tours of Southern plantations

Fictional accounts of white Southerners make it seem like it was fun to be a slave on a plantation at holiday time. Many of today's tours repeat such stories.
A portrait from 1868 of abolitionist Harriet Tubman. AP Photo/Sait Serkan Gurbuz

Faith made Harriet Tubman fearless as she rescued slaves

Among Tubman's most daring feats was helping slaves escape. She believed she went into trances and had visions. These, to her, were God's way of guiding her, which made her quite fearless.
Women dance during a protest march against the killing of activists, in Bogota, Colombia, on July 26, 2019. Colombians took to the streets to call for an end to a wave of killings in the wake of the nation’s peace deal. (AP Photo/Ivan Valencia)

El Grito: Violence in Colombia continues to kill activists

In Colombia, a 2016 peace agreement does not contain the ongoing violence. Violence escalates as criminal armed groups replace the FARC rebels in a violent battle for land and resources.
A racial wealth gap is persisting after centuries enslavement and systemic discrimination. Hyejin Kang/Shutterstock.com

The case for African American reparations, explained

Thanks to demographic and political changes, Democratic contenders are addressing this issue for the first time.
President Abraham Lincoln in 1865 and Vice President Joseph Biden in 2019. Library of Congress, photo Alexander Gardner; AP/Nati Harnik

Abraham Lincoln, Joe Biden and the politics of touch

The news is filled with stories about inappropriate touching by politicians. But touch by politicians was long important in the US, and Abraham Lincoln's handshake helped engage and guide the nation.
Family members of Sunni men and boys in Iraq accused of supporting ISIS hold up pictures of their arrested relatives. AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo

Iraq’s brutal crackdown on suspected Islamic State supporters could trigger civil war

Iraq beat the Islamic State. Now, its Shia government is jailing and even executing all suspected terrorists – most of them Sunni Muslims. The clampdown may inflame a centuries-old sectarian divide.
In the 19th century, white families in the U.S. could easily acquire real estate. This was never the case for Black Americans. U.S. National Archives

The myth of the American Frontier still shapes U.S. racial divides

Old 19th-century agreements between the U.S. government which expelled Indigenous peoples from their land and gave it cheaply to white settlers continue to impact inequalities in the United States.
The remains of an Ixil man emerge from the ground, one of the countless victims of the civil war in Guatemala. Tristan Brand/FAFG Fundacion de Antropologia Forense de Guatemala

‘It is the job of the living to save the dead from drowning’

The Ixil people of Guatemala dream of the places where their dead, massacred during the country's armed conflict might be located.
To help with the rebuilding of Syria, we need to curb the rising tide of xenophobia online. Syrian refugees get ready to cross back into war-torn Syria from the eastern Lebanese border town of Arsal, June 28, 2018. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)

Syrian refugees — the need for an image reboot

One of the World Bank's mandates is to prepare for the physical and human capital reconstructions of post-conflict Syria. But an image reconstruction of Syrians and of Syrian refugees is also needed

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