Articles on Humanities

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Pfc Elias Friedensohn in June 1945 at the Special Services Distributing Point, Seine Section, Paris, France. National Archives

The American GI in WWII, uncensored

An unprecedented survey of US GIs that began in 1941, preserved on microfilm, provides a raw and uncensored story of average Americans grappling with both national ideals and practical necessities.
A Syrian archeologist holds an artifact that was transported to Damascus for safe-keeping during the Syrian Civil War. AP Photo/Hassan Ammar

We’re just beginning to grasp the toll of the Islamic State’s archaeological looting in Syria

According to a new study, a small portion of a site can yield thousands of objects, adding up to millions of dollars.
The potions classroom at the Making of Harry Potter Studio. Alex Volosianko

Why the ancient promise of alchemy is fulfilled in reading

Potions, spells and alchemy are intriguing to children and adults alike. A professor of literature explains what's behind this fascination and reveals where to experience the magic of transformation.
Members of East Baltimore Church of God, which was founded by Lumbee Indians, and was once located in the heart of ‘the reservation,’ in the 1700 block of E. Baltimore Street. Photo courtesy of Rev. Robert E. Dodson Jr., Pastor, East Baltimore Church of God

A quest to reconstruct Baltimore’s American Indian ‘reservation’

A folklorist is working to preserve the history of a unique, urban community of Lumbee Indians.
A photograph of Ellen N. La Motte soon after completing ‘The Backwash of War’ in 1916. Courtesy of the National Archives, College Park, Maryland

Did a censored female writer inspire Hemingway’s famous style?

Ellen N. La Motte's 'The Backwash of War' was praised for its clear-eyed portrayal of war, but was swiftly banned. Yet the similarities between her spare prose and Hemingway's are unmistakable.
Students are far more understanding of their religious peers if they attend classes about religious diversity. from shutterstock.com

Want a safer world for your children? Teach them about diverse religions and worldviews

Australian society is made up of people from different backgrounds and faiths. Teaching school children about religious diversity and traditions makes them more tolerant of religious minorities.
Library subjects and call numbers can be the subject of controversy. jakkaje808/shutterstock.com

The bias hiding in your library

The way books are sorted at the library can be highly political, touching upon issues of race and identity.
Preliminary drawing of title page for ‘Where the Wild Things Are’ (New York: Harper & Row, 1963), 26:7, The Maurice Sendak Collection. Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Library. © The Maurice Sendak Foundation.

From ‘Wild Horses’ to ‘Wild Things,’ a window into Maurice Sendak’s creative process

The book took eight years from conception to publication. In the earliest dummy, the monsters that millions have grown to love actually started out as horses.
Instead of overreacting to minor slights, it’s healthier to just say, ‘pyt.’ Ezume Images/Shutterstock.com

A Danish word the world needs to combat stress: Pyt

Pyt doesn't have an exact English translation, but there's a rich strain of psychological research devoted to its benefits in everyday life.
President Donald Trump, former President Barack Obama and former President Bill Clinton, during the funeral for former President George H.W. Bush. AP Photo/Alex Brandon, Pool

Must the president be a moral leader?

Presidents Day celebrates the American president – not only as a political leader, but as a moral leader. But can a president be a person of strong moral character, as well as a strong leader?
During Super Bowl LIII, will Atlanta’s long struggle for racial equality be highlighted or glossed over? Peter Ciro/flickr

Super Bowl LIII and the soul of Atlanta

The country's 'Black Mecca' is hosting the Super Bowl. With the NFL's national anthem controversy still lingering, this creates an undeniable paradox.

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