Articles on Refugees

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“Give me your tired and your poor who can stand on their own two feet. And who will not become a public charge,” said Acting head of Citizenship and Immigration Services Ken Cuccinelli. AP Photo/Seth Wenig

Trump administration revives public charge clause that kept Nazi-era refugees from the US

During the Nazi era, roughly 300,000 additional Jewish refugees could have gained entry to the U.S. But the immigration law’s “likely to become a public charge” clause kept them out.
Attraction and retention: the key issues to get more immigrants to settle in regional Australia. Flickr/Toowoomba Region

The regions can take more migrants and refugees, with a little help

Migrants who've settled in regional Australia find jobs, get on with the locals and feel safe. So the government wants to know how to encourage more migrants to move there.
Phoenix Raei plays an Iranian refugee forced to join a fight club in a detention centre in the film Below. Melbourne International Film Festival

A new Australian film set in an immigration detention centre is a jarring mix of violence, satire and humanism

In the film Below, a fight club is set up in a fictional, remote immigration detention centre. However the film’s shock tactics often feel manufactured, and risk exploiting the refugee crisis as mere backdrop.
Honduran migrant Vicky Chavez with her daughter Issabella on May 31, 2018 in the First Unitarian Church in Salt Lake City, where she sought protection from deportation in late 2017. AP Photo/Rick Bowmer

More Central American migrants take shelter in churches, recalling 1980s sanctuary movement

The number of migrants living in churches has spiked recently in anticipation of threatened immigration raids, but churches have long protected refugees in an act of faith-based civil disobedience.
A Rohingya refugee girl sells vegetables in Kutupalong refugee camp, Bangladesh. Access to education is extremely limited in the camps, and most children — particularly girls — receive little to no formal education, Aug. 28, 2018. AP Photo/Altaf Qadri

Without school, a ‘lost generation’ of Rohingya refugee children face uncertain future

An estimated 500,000 Rohingya children, refugees from Myanmar, are growing up in Bangladesh in overcrowded camps with no access to formal education.
A Syrian family loads their belongings as they evacuate an informal refugee camp in Deir Al-Ahmar, east Lebanon, June 9, 2019. AP/Hussein Malla

Are Syrian refugees a danger to the West?

Will Syrian religious extremists migrate to the West as refugees in need – and then do harm? A team of researchers surveyed Syrian refugees in Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey to find out the answer.
A new Trump ruling will prohibit virtually all Central American migrants from seeking asylum in the United States. AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell

The Bible says to welcome refugees

Scripture strongly and unequivocally affirms the obligation to treat strangers with dignity and hospitality, says a Christian scholar who turns to the Bible for guidance on Trump's immigration policy.
A Rohingya Muslim woman from Myanmar holds her child as they arrive at Kuala Kedah Jetty, in Kedah State, Malaysia, April 3, 2018. Stringer/EPA

The right to work can empower refugees in Malaysia

Granting refugees in Malaysia the legal right to work will empower them, give them the chance to accumulate social and capital resources, and benefit them and the country.
Displaced Yemeni girls, who fled their home because of fighting at the port city of Hodeida, are seen in a school allocated for IDPs in Sanaa, Yemen. (AP Photo/Hani Mohammed)

Canada must step up to help millions displaced inside their own countries

Building on our track record of support for refugee resettlement, Canada should stand up for those uprooted within their own countries and unable to reach our shores.
The medevac law was passed to streamline the process for emergency medical evacuation of refugees from Manus Island and Nauru. Thirty-one people have been transferred since its passage. Refugee Action Coalition

Peter Dutton is whipping up fear on the medevac law, but it defies logic and compassion

With parliament sitting next week, the home affairs minister is pressuring Labor to support a repeal of the medevac law. But the law has worked just as it was intended.
A Rohingya refugee mother protects herself and child with an umbrella carrying the logos of several European aid organisations. EPA-EFE/K M ASAD

Rohingya refugees: focusing only on their return home ignores the crime and health crises in Bangladesh’s camps

Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh have been stuck in makeshift camps for years. They are now being targeted by criminal gangs, alongside public health and well-being issues.

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