Articles on Russian revolution

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To try and understand the Russian revolution outside of the broader social context of the time is to neglect the development of nationhood in the region. Wikicommons

World politics explainer: the Russian revolution

The Russian Revolution – an event that affected more than Russia and was more than a revolution.
Across the world, allegations of sexual assault have hinged on women’s credibility. Michael Reynolds/Pool Photo via AP

Kavanaugh sexual assault hearing evokes early Soviet mock trials

A century ago, Russian leaders staged mock trials on rape and abortion to educate citizens about new Soviet laws and values. Then, as now, victim-blaming and 'he said, she said' marred the verdict.
On the streets of Petrograd on July 4, 1917, when troops of the provisional government opened fire on demonstrators. Viktor Bulla/Wikimedia Commons

Conquered city, site of revolutions from above and below

The physical and political space of cities can be shaped from above or below, but few have had more revolutionary changes, first under the tsars, then the communists, than St Petersburg.
Vladimir Lenin and Nadezhda Krupskaya. Antoon Kuper/flickr

Nadya Krupskaya: the Russian revolutionary

Russian revolutionary Nadezhda Krupskaya, like other leading women in the new Stalin-led state, was marginalised. But in her case, because she was Lenin's widow.
Female protesters in Petrograd (now St Petersburg) in 1917 on International Women’s Day. Wikimedia Commons

One American woman’s life in revolutionary Russia

How a journalist from Nebraska chased the 'Soviet dream' all the way to Russia, only to be expelled on accusations of espionage.
Alie Fataar, photographed during his exile in Zambia, was a revolutionary teacher. Courtesy of Alie Fataar

Born into revolution: reflections on a radical teacher’s life

Alie Fataar exemplifies the type of teacher South Africa sorely requires today if its classrooms are to be used to develop a new generation of critical, engaged students.
The Tsar Nicholas II and his son Alexei in capitivity in Tobolsk in 1917. Romanov Collection, General Collection, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University/Wikimedia Commons

The enduring mystique around the Romanovs, Russia’s last royals

As the remains of the Tsar and Tsarina are exhumed, why their story continues to enthral.

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