Articles on World War I

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Part of a black cotton cushion cover depicting the Australian coat of arms embroidered by Lance Corporal Alfred Briggs (Albert Biggs), 20 Battalion, AIF. Courtesy of Australian War Memorial

Stitching lives back together: men’s rehabilitation embroidery in WWI

Embroidery - often seen as women's work - was a common form of therapy for troops wounded in the first world war. One soldier, Albert Biggs, learned to sew with his left hand after his right arm was badly injured.
President Woodrow Wilson addressing a joint session of Congress on April 2, 1917, urging a declaration that a state of war exists. AP Photo

1917: Woodrow Wilson’s call to war pulled America onto a global stage

Wilson coined the phrase 'America First' and appealed for 'peace without victory.' But on April 2, 1917 he asked Congress for a declaration of war. The impact on American foreign policy was profound.
The Navy converted to oil from coal a few years before the U.S. entered World War I, helping to solidify petroleum’s strategic status. Naval History and Heritage Command

How World War I ushered in the century of oil

Before World War I, petroleum had few practical uses, but it emerged from the war as a strategic global asset necessary for national stability and security.
Some soldiers’ wounds in WWI were more mental than physical. George Metcalf Archival Collection

From shell-shock to PTSD, a century of invisible war trauma

Mental health trauma has always been a part of war. Treatments have come a long way over the last century, but we still don't understand why the responses change for different people and times.
Peace Delegates on the Noordam – Mrs. P. Lawrence, Jane Addams, Anna Molloy. Library of Congress

Why women’s peace activism in World War I matters now

A century ago, American women organized to protest World War I. The fact that their efforts failed isn't the most important point.

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