Artikel-artikel mengenai Aboriginal health

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Australia’s first Aboriginal Brain Injury Coordinator, Rebecca Clinch, with brain injury survivor Justin Kickett. Edith Cowan University

Aboriginal Australians want care after brain injury. But it must consider their cultural needs

The absence of Indigenous Australians in rehabilitation services has created the belief they don't want therapy. The reality is they want services which better meet their cultural needs.
Being separated from their children affects the mental well-being of Aboriginal mothers in prison. ChrisMilesProductions/Shutterstock

Aboriginal mothers are incarcerated at alarming rates – and their mental and physical health suffers

Aboriginal mothers in prison feel intergenerational trauma and the forced removal of their children are the most significant factors impacting their health and well-being.
Balgo artists: Miriam Baadjo (b. 1957),Tossie Baadjo (b. 1958), Jane Gimme (b. 1958), Gracie Mosquito (b. 1955), Helen Nagomara (b. 1953), Ann Frances Nowee (b. 1964) and Imelda Yukenbarri (b. 1954). Bush medicine: a collaborative work by women from Wirrimanu (Balgo), 2018, acrylic on linen, 120×180cm, MHM2018.32, © Warlayirti Artists; Medical History Museum

The art of healing: five medicinal plants used by Aboriginal Australians

At least half the food eaten by the first Australians came from plants. And in terms of medicines, many different parts of plants were used.
Unless we design research programs to look at why people would rather stay on country than receive effective health treatments, Aboriginal health may not improve. Dan Peled/AAP

Controlled experiments won’t tell us which Indigenous health programs are working

Like all good health care, improving health in remote settings requires an evidence base. But forcing all research questions into the randomised controlled trial model is not the answer.
Policies and services designed to protect Aboriginal children’s cultural connections are not being properly implemented. AAP Image/Dan Peled

Australia failing to safeguard cultural connections for Aboriginal children in out-of-home care

New reports show a widespread lack of care for the cultural needs of many of the 19,000 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in child protection and out-of-home care.
The facilities were poor and some inmates were subjected to unsuccessful experimentation with a “vaccine” that used arsenic compounds. Hospital Ward Dorre Island/State library of Western Australia

What do the newspapers really tell us about the lock hospital histories?

The lock hospitals inflicted incalculable traumas on Aboriginal people, wrenching them away from families and country.
In the SBS documentary series Who Do You Think You Are?, Peter Garrett traces the history of his grandmother, who worked in the “lock hospitals” as a nurse. Screenshot/Who Do You Think You Are/ SBS

Acknowledge the brutal history of Indigenous health care – for healing

Hundreds of Aboriginal people were incarcerated on Dorre and Bernier islands for "venereal disease" between 1908 and 1919. The lock hospitals were penal rather than therapeutic institutions.
Of 1082 Indigenous specific. programs identified in the report, 92% have never been evaluated to see if they are achieving their objectives. AAP/Dan Peled

How to get a better bang for the taxpayers’ buck in all sectors, not only Indigenous programs

A new report highlights how little we know about what works and what doesn't when it comes to publicly-funded Indigenous programs. It's a similar story in other policy areas – but we can do better.
Birthing on country generally refers to an Aboriginal mother giving birth to her child on the lands of their ancestors. Skylines/Shutterstock

Why we need to support Aboriginal women’s choice to give birth on country

Where birthing on country is not offered, women leave their families weeks before birth. Or she can choose to give birth in her community without skilled birth attendants, which is risky.
Aboriginal groups need to play an active part in Aboriginal health to ensure we get it right. Dan Peled/AAP

How to reform primary health care to close the gap

How can primary health networks work closely with Aboriginal services to ensure health care is appropriate and culturally competent?
To improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander nutrition and health we need real community consultation, improved public governance and political will. Gina Lyons, Irrunytju WA. Photo by Suzanne Bryce, NPY Women’s Council.

We can close the Indigenous nutrition gap – here’s how

After years of neglect and a notable absence in last week's Closing the Gap report, nutrition is finally being recognised as integral to closing the gap on Indigenous disadvantage.

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