Articles on Intergenerational trauma

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The system of ‘birth alerts’ across Canada perpetuates the removal of children from Indigenous families begun by residential schools. Pictured here: a historical report on residential schools released by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

British Columbia’s ban on ‘birth alerts:’ A guiding light on the road to reconciliation

To make meaningful progress on the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada's Calls to Action, all provinces and territories should promptly follow B.C. and ban discriminatory 'birth alerts.'
Following the deaths of an alarming number Indigenous young people earlier this year, Australian leaders were urged to declare a ‘national crisis’. Shutterstock

Australia has been silent on Indigenous suicide for too long, and it must change

Policies aimed at reducing youth suicide will fail if they don't acknowledge the cumulative effects of history, associated intergenerational trauma and ongoing violence towards Indigenous Australians.
Being separated from their children affects the mental well-being of Aboriginal mothers in prison. ChrisMilesProductions/Shutterstock

Aboriginal mothers are incarcerated at alarming rates – and their mental and physical health suffers

Aboriginal mothers in prison feel intergenerational trauma and the forced removal of their children are the most significant factors impacting their health and well-being.
Over the past five years, one in every four children who died by suicide in Australia was Indigenous. Shutterstock

Why are we losing so many Indigenous children to suicide?

Poverty and social exclusion play a big role in Indigenous child suicide. The causes are complex but we know enough to act now to reduce the number of deaths in our communities.
Policies and services designed to protect Aboriginal children’s cultural connections are not being properly implemented. AAP Image/Dan Peled

Australia failing to safeguard cultural connections for Aboriginal children in out-of-home care

New reports show a widespread lack of care for the cultural needs of many of the 19,000 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in child protection and out-of-home care.
The facilities were poor and some inmates were subjected to unsuccessful experimentation with a “vaccine” that used arsenic compounds. Hospital Ward Dorre Island/State library of Western Australia

What do the newspapers really tell us about the lock hospital histories?

The lock hospitals inflicted incalculable traumas on Aboriginal people, wrenching them away from families and country.

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