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Several thousand protestors opposed to the COVID-19 vaccine march through the streets of midtown Manhattan in New York on Sept. 18, 2021. Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis News via Getty Images

Can healthy people who eat right and exercise skip the COVID-19 vaccine? A research scientist and fitness enthusiast explains why the answer is no

A growing body of research shows that nutrition, sleep, exercise and a host of other lifestyle choices can help optimize the immune system. But they are no substitute for life-saving vaccines.
Early detection of diabetes is important in setting treatment targets Xinhua/Mohamed Khidir via Getty Images

Diabetes targets would cost more but the impact would be worth it: here’s how

Targets for diabetes would improve healthy lives, reduce deaths, and be cost effective. But they should not be for managing diabetes alone; they must include treating hypertension.
Women who have had pre-eclampsia have twice the risk of heart disease throughout their lifetime than their peers. From shutterstock.com

Had pre-eclampsia in pregnancy? These 5 things will lower your risk of heart disease

Symptoms of pre-eclampsia, including high blood pressure, usually resolve by about two months after the birth. But some health problems can develop later.
Osteoporosis affects one in three women, but men are also concerned. Shutterstock

Could the solution to osteoporosis be in the bile?

There is no treatment for osteoporosis, which affects millions of people and costs billions of euros every year. What if the solution was in the bile? Explanations.
Venom from box jellyfish causes extreme pain and tissue damage. Massive exposure can cause death. from www.shutterstock.com

How we used CRISPR to narrow in on a possible antidote to box jellyfish venom

Box jellyfish stings are excruciating and occasionally deadly. We have identified a common, cheap drug that is already on the market and which could be a treatment candidate with further development.
Syrian refugee family Mohammad Al Mnajer and wife Fouzia Al Hashish sit with their three daughters Judy, second left, Jaidaa, far right, and Baylasan as they eat their after school snack at their home in Mississauga, Ont., in December 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Immigrant children’s health declines rapidly after arrival in Canada

Research shows that many immigrants are healthier than Canadians when they arrive in the country. The longer they stay, the more their health declines.
Foxys Forest Manufacture/Shutterstock.com

Why we shouldn’t all be vegan

Looking after animals and saving the planet sounds like a good idea. But getting there is not as simple as a some people seem to imagine.
A mix of fats, such as those found in nuts, avocados, salmon and olives, could be healthy and more satisfying. Craevschii Family/Shutterstock.com

Let them eat more fat? Researcher argues that a balance of types of fat is the key

When did eating become so confusing? In the 1960s, studies began to show a link between heart disease and dietary fat, and fat was demonized. As it turns out, fat is nuanced and may not be so bad.
Only around half of at-risk Indigenous Australians are taking preventative medication for heart disease. from www.shutterstock.com

Getting a heart check early can prevent heart attack and stroke in Indigenous Australians

A new study has found too few Indigenous people are getting health checks, despite their elevated risk of heart problems.
College is a fun time for young adults, but it can also become an unhealthy time. oneinchpunch/Shutterstock.com

College students may not be as heart-healthy as they think

College students may think they are living a fit life, but a recent study adds to growing research that suggests that many students are developing risk factors for heart disease.
Governments in countries such as Mexico and the United Kingdom have responded to the over-consumption of refined sugar with a “sugar tax;” Canada lags behind. (Unsplash/Neven Krcmarek)

Just how bad is all that sugar for your heart?

Too much refined sugar in your diet is not just a risk factor for obesity and diabetes, it also increases your chances of heart disease.

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