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Articles on Global warming

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Flares burn at the Shell Norco Manufacturing Complex in 2021, in Norco, La. Plants like this produce not only greenhouse gas emissions, but also excess heat. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

Thermoelectric technologies can help power a zero-carbon future

Human societies produce huge amounts of excess heat. Turning it into electricity could play a key role in achieving a net-zero society.
People walking on a pathway watch crews flood the ice on the Rideau Canal Skateway in Ottawa on Feb. 17, 2024. The Skateway opened in late January but mild weather and freezing rain forced it to close after only four days. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

How global warming is reshaping winter life in Canada

Global warming is melting away an iconic cornerstone of Canadian culture — outdoor skating.
Signs reflecting conspiracy theories around the 15-minute city are displayed outside Parliament Hill in May 2023. Alongside other comparable initiatives, 15-minute cities represent an effort to place collective health and well-being at the centre of urban planning. (Shutterstock)

New study reveals four critical barriers to building healthier Canadian cities

Canada’s cities must be planned around resident health and well-being, our research reveals the key barriers to developing truly healthy cities.
Too much fresh water from Greenland’s ice sheet can slow the Atlantic Ocean’s circulation. Paul Souders/Stone via Getty Images

Atlantic Ocean is headed for a tipping point − once melting glaciers shut down the Gulf Stream, we would see extreme climate change within decades, study shows

Scientists now have a better understanding of the risks ahead and a new early warning signal to watch for.
Crowds gather at the Saturday market in Lalibela, Ethiopia in 2019. Sub-Saharan Africa’s population is growing three times faster than the global average. (Shutterstock)

Demography and reproductive rights are environmental issues: Insights from sub-Saharan Africa

Environmental policymakers and scholars must listen to sub-Saharan Africans’ voices and recognize the importance of population for achieving sustainable development goals.
Infrastructure can increase vulnerabilities to coastal cities like New York. GlennisEhi/Getty Images

From New York to Jakarta, land in many coastal cities is sinking faster than sea levels are rising

Land subsidence is a factor as preparations are made for rising sea levels and strengthening storms. Human infrastructure, including buildings and groundwater extraction, increases vulnerabilities.
People watch COP28 President Sultan al-Jaber on a screen as he speaks during a plenary session at the COP28 UN Climate Summit, Dec. 13, 2023, in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

Access and exclusion: What COP28 revealed about the dynamics of global climate diplomacy

Beyond the international negotiations, COP serves as a critical venue for global civil societies to exchange knowledge, organize and build a better world.

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