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Articles on Latin America

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Chinese engineers pose after welding the first seamless rails for the China-Laos railway in Vientiane, Laos, June 18, 2020. Kaikeo Saiyasane/Xinhua via Getty Images

China is financing infrastructure projects around the world – many could harm nature and Indigenous communities

Through its Belt and Road Initiative, China has become the world’s largest country-to-country lender. A new study shows that more than half of its loans threaten sensitive lands or Indigenous people.
Mexico City on Aug. 8, 2021: lots of masks, not so much social distancing. Luis Barron / Eyepix Group/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Mexico, facing its third COVID-19 wave, shows the dangers of weak federal coordination

COVID-19 cases in Mexico are approaching the highest levels seen during the second wave in late January 2021, with about 22,000 new infections a day. A slow vaccine rollout is stunting progress.
The relationship between immigrants’ and refugees’ education, experience and economic integration matters. It can tell us whether Latinos are unemployed or underemployed or contributing to the Canadian economy. (Shutterstock)

Latin Americans face a stubborn pay gap in Canada, data shows

Although Latinos are present across all Canadian labour markets, they are lagging behind the Canadian median total income. What does that mean for their economic integration?
An Argentine justice crusader who calls himself Menganno has been patrolling the streets of the city of Lanus since 2010. Netflix has now picked up his character. Netflix Latinoamérica (screenshot)

How Latin America’s protest superheroes fight injustice and climate change – and sometimes crime, too

In Latin America, common citizens have often donned outlandish outfits and comic book-inspired personas to lead demonstrations and promote social change.
A soldier stands guard in front of the Brazilian national flag on Army Day in Sao Paulo, 18 April 2019. Miguel Schincariol/AFP

Brazil: the road to Jair Bolsonaro’s militarised democracy

Don’t be fooled by the recent resignation of three members of the military in Brazil – the country is heading down an increasingly militarised path.
Coprophanaeus lancifer, a large seed-disperser dung beetle in the Amazon. Hannah Griffiths

Counting mammals, birds and dung beetles could be vital for saving the Amazon

We know surprisingly little about the millions of animals, plants and birds that live in the Amazon – here’s how we can understand them better.
Protesters attend an anti-government march at Plaza Bolivar in Bogota, Colombia, where citizens have taken to the streets for weeks after proposed tax increases and to decry police brutality. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)

Why Colombians are taking to the streets to protest state violence

The Colombian government responded violently to a general strike over tax reforms that primarily affected working-class citizens. It has fueled calls for police reform.
El Salvador is likely to become the first country to adopt bitcoin as legal tender. Momentum Fotograh/Shutterstock

Bitcoin: El Salvador’s grand experiment

El Salvador has become the first country to adopt bitcoin as legal tender. This is a noble idea, but unworkable in the long term.
A deforested piece of land in the Amazon rainforest near Porto Velho, in the state of Rondonia, in northern Brazil, on Aug. 23, 2019. Carl De SouzaA/FP via Getty Images

Brazil’s economic crisis, prolonged by COVID-19, poses an enormous challenge to the Amazon

Because Brazil’s economic prosperity in the last two decades is increasingly linked to the Amazon’s good health, restoring the country’s economy is a critical first step toward ending deforestation.

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