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Articles on Melanoma

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Men are 17% more likely to be diagnosed with cancer than they were 30 years ago. fizkes/Shutterstock

29,000 cancers overdiagnosed in Australia in a single year

New research estimates 24% of cancers in men that were detected in 2012 were overdiagnosed, meaning they never would have caused harm if left untreated.
Professor Fabian V. Filipp lectures on the biology of malignant melanoma and pigmentation disease. The color of skin is due to the presence of a pigment called melanin, which can absorb cancer-causing sunlight. Photo by Systems Biology and Cancer Metabolism Laboratory, Fabian V. Filipp. Used with permission. CC BY-SA.

Success of immunotherapy stimulates future pigment cell and melanoma research

An international team of researchers is probing the links between skin diseases, including cancer, to speed the search for cures.
Individuals using indoor tanning are exposed to two types of UV rays – UVA and UVB – that damage skin and DNA and can lead to cancer, including the deadliest one: melanoma. Young users are most at risk. By Rido/shutterstock.com

Health clubs using tanning beds to attract members despite cancer risks, new study shows

Many gyms use free tanning beds to lure in new members who are eager to look and feel their best. But this, argues Sherry Pagoto, runs against the health lifestyle premise these gyms are advocating.
Bright sun and fatty foods are a bad recipe for your DNA. By Tish1/shutterstock.com

How summer and diet damage your DNA, and what you can do

Scientists have long thought that regions of DNA called telomeres control how long you live. We are now learning that it is your diet and lifestyle that shape your telomeres, not the other way around.
Professor Fabian V. Filipp with his team working on precision targeting of malignant melanoma. Systems Biology and Cancer Metabolism Laboratory

Sure, cancer mutates, but it has other ways to resist treatment

Cancer is a disease of our genes, but resistance to therapy might go beyond cancer mutations. The DNA stays the same, but cancer cells outsmart the drugs by switching their gene activity.
People who are unable to tan and who have moles on their skin are among those at heightened risk of developing melanoma. from shutterstock.com

New online tool can predict your melanoma risk

Australians over the age of 40 can now calculate their risk of developing melanoma with a new online test.

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