Glasgow Caledonian University

Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU) is an international university delivering excellence to around 20,000 students, with an over-arching focus as a University for the Common Good. It has a Glasgow campus and outreach campuses in London and New York, and partnerships in Bangladesh and Oman, offering a dynamic environment for learning, teaching and applied research.

International anti-poverty campaigner and Nobel Peace Prize winner Professor Muhammad Yunus was installed as Chancellor in October 2012. Professor Yunus provides leadership, advice and support to the University and has pledged his inspirational stewardship in support of GCU’s undertaking to harness its intellectual, social and emotional capital and collaborate with others to find solutions to some of society’s most pressing challenges.

GCU’s commitment to the Common Good is realised in applied research which addresses three major societal challenges, enabling communities in the UK and internationally to build inclusive societies and live healthy lives in sustainable environments. GCU is ranked in the top 20 in the UK for health research at world-leading and internationally excellent standards. Almost two-thirds of GCU’s social work and social policy research is rated world-leading and internationally excellent. It also has research strengths in engineering, history and the built environment.

GCU is a signatory to the United Nations PRME initiative (Principles for Responsible Management Education) and is the first Scottish university to join the UN Global Compact, the world’s largest voluntary corporate responsible management initiative.

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