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Articles on Grocery stores

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Many grocery store workers have experienced high rates of anxiety and depression during the pandemic. Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images

Grocery workers suffer the mental health effects of customer hostility and lack of safety in their workplace

Supermarket employees, still laboring in crisis mode, continue to report significant rises in physical and mental health problems.
Free bagged lunches are ready for distribution at a public school in Fayette, Miss., on March 3, 2021. AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis

The pandemic has made it even harder for one in three Americans to obtain healthy, affordable food

A recent survey finds that the pandemic made it harder for many US households to put food on the table. It also changed the ways in which people buy and store food.
High-touch surfaces in grocery stores were tested as a potential transmission point for SARS-CoV-2. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Christopher Katsarov 

Testing high-touch surfaces in grocery stores for COVID-19

The risk of COVID-19 exposure from high-touch surfaces within grocery stores is low if physical distancing guidelines and recommended cleaning protocols are followed.
Food prices are poised to become higher post-pandemic. But using technology smartly and humanely can put the brakes to food price inflation. (Pixabay)

Food is poised to get a lot more expensive, but it doesn’t have to

How to keep food prices down? Use technology to change the way we produce food and public policy to ensure there’s a fair price put on things like climate change, human labour and animal welfare.
Self-isolating may mean many Canadians will be forced to spend more time in the kitchen, a place that’s been foreign to most millennials, according to a new survey. (Shutterstock)

Making and breaking bread during the coronavirus pandemic: Home cooking could make a comeback

One positive thing coming out of pandemic-related self-isolation could be that people will spend more time in their kitchens, a place where fewer Canadians have ventured in recent years.
An entire section of meat and poultry is left empty after panicked shoppers swept through in fear of the coronavirus at a grocery store in Burbank, Calif. on March 14, 2020. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)

Coronavirus: The perils of our ‘just enough, just in time’ food system

COVID-19 is showing us we must work collectively to put resilience alongside efficiency as the primary drivers for the systems we depend upon each and every day for food.

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