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Articles on Healthy eating

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Childhood, adolescence, pregnancy, menopause, 75+: how your diet should change with each stage of life

Childhood, adolescence, pregnancy, menopause, 75+: how your diet should change with each stage of life. The Conversation, CC BY56.6 MB (download)
Once you get older, the focus moves to trying not to lose your muscle tissue. So as you age, your protein requirements actually start to go up.
There’s currently no peer-reviewed research published in any major scientific journals backing up the hormone diet’s claims. Shutterstock/Gts

Hormone diets are all the rage, but do they actually work?

Expert looks at latest diet trend which claims 'resetting' your hormones is the key to losing stubborn weight.
Science can help you decide which diet works best for you. wavebreakmedia/shutterstock.com

Confused about what to eat? Science can help

'Why is nutrition so confusing?' is a common lament, but the truth is out there. Forget fad diets and media hype. It's time to harness the power of science to create a healthy and sustainable diet.
Most consumers are unaware that the Health Star Rating system is compensatory, and that one negative nutritional attribute, such as high sugar, can be cancelled out by a positive attribute like fibre. from www.shutterstock.com

Why the Australasian Health Star Rating needs major changes to make it work

A food heath labelling system Australia and New Zealand introduced five years ago is under review and needs a significant overhaul to make it useful for consumers looking for healthy options.
Kids are exposed to junk foods often, but encouraging healthy foods at home can make a difference. Adobe stock

Kids’ diets and screen time: to set up good habits, make healthy choices the default at home

Although it's not possible for parents to completely shield their kids from screens and junk food, in the home they have a unique opportunity to establish healthy behaviours.
Research with Canadian families found that modelling of healthy food intake by fathers, but not by mothers, was associated with a healthier diet among their children. (Shutterstock)

Fathers are vitally important to their kids’ health and to public health research

Most Canadian children spend too much time on screens and don't eat enough fruit and vegetables. Fathers can help by modelling healthy behaviours and getting involved in research.

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