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Articles on Poultry

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The strain of H5N1 bird flu identified in Canada, the United States and Europe can cause severe disease and high mortality in domestic poultry. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

Avian influenza: How bird flu affects domestic and wild flocks, and why a One Health approach matters

Avian influenza virus — or bird flu — can infect domestic poultry such as chickens and turkeys, as well as wild birds. The H5N1 strain has been identified in Canada.
An entovegan might happily eat an insect burger like this one, believing that their diet is both sustainable and ethical. Karen Bleier/AFP via Getty Images

More people are eating bugs – but is it ethical to farm insects for food?

Insect farming is growing in popularity as an alternative to traditional livestock and feed production. A scholar evaluates what that means in terms of trillions of insect lives.
Nearly 1,000 workers at this Smithfield Foods pork-processing plant in South Dakota contracted COVID-19 between mid-March and mid-April 2020. Kerem Yucel / AFP via Getty Images

Meatpacking plants have been deadly COVID-19 hot spots – but policies that encourage workers to show up sick are legal

Thousands of workers at meat- and poultry-processing plants have contracted COVID-19, and hundreds have died. A legal scholar recommends ways to make their jobs safer.
George Aubert rescues one of his chickens from rising floodwaters caused by Hurricane Matthew in Fair Bluff, North Carolina, in 2016. Sean Rayford/Getty Images

Worsening hurricane season threatens billions of chickens

More than half the US production of broiler chickens is in states along the coast frequently struck by hurricanes.
Backyard chickens may seem free and happy, but are at increased risk of contracting diseases from wild birds. Bruce Turner/Flickr

Why it’s wrong to blame livestock farms for coronavirus

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, some critics say livestock farms promote diseases that spread from animals to humans. An animal scientist explains how well-run farms work to keep that from happening.
While this research has merit, it doesn’t exactly tell us eating chicken reduces risk of breast cancer. From shutterstock.com

Will eating chicken reduce your risk of breast cancer?

Recent reports suggested eating chicken could reduce the risk of breast cancer. In the study, those who ate chicken were at lower risk – when compared to women who ate large quantities of red meat.
Cattle that are grass-fed, antibiotic- and growth hormone-free gather at a farm in Oregon in 2015. There’s a debate over whether antibiotic use in livestock makes germs more resistant to the drugs, and results in infections being passed on to humans who consume the meat. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)

Why reducing antibiotics in farm animals isn’t as easy as it seems

The use of antibiotics in raising livestock is complex. We could be moving towards a less-than-ideal result due to poor understanding, over-simplistic messaging and a rush for competitive advantage.
Donald Trump doesn’t liked to be reined in, which is why he has such a problem with trade deals like NAFTA. (The Associated Press)

New NAFTA or no NAFTA? How Trump’s ire could affect Canadian agri-food

Part of the purpose of trade deals is to prevent politicians from inserting politics into matters of commerce. Donald Trump is bucking that trend. What does it mean for Canada and NAFTA?
There are concerns that the new draft poultry standards don’t truly have chickens’ welfare at heart. Ben Romalis/Shutterstock.com

Governments can’t be trusted to deliver welfare standards for chickens

The current review of standards for egg and poultry farming does little to assuage fears that the industry wields too much influence. Only an independent regulator can restore public confidence.
Cooked chicken meat imported from China could end up in U.S. restaurant meals without information about its origin. Jacek Chabraszewski/Shutterstock

How safe is chicken imported from China? 5 questions answered

China has started exporting cooked chicken meat to the United States. Is it safe to eat? An agriculture extension specialist discusses possible concerns about food safety and contamination.

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