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Articles on Public health campaigns

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Crises disrupt our expectations for the future, thereby affecting our emotions, planning behaviours and identities. (Unsplash/Nick Fewings)

Successful health campaigns during COVID-19 need to manage our altered ideas about the future

When a crisis like COVID-19 disrupts expectations for the future, it also disrupts how health messaging works. Advertising research shows three ways that health campaigns can succeed in a crisis.
Public service announcements, news articles and social media posts are all part of the coronavirus messaging landscape. Noam Galai via Getty Images

COVID-19 public health messages have been all over the place – but researchers know how to do better

During the pandemic, clear and reliable health communication can literally be a life-and-death issue. Researchers who focus on the science of science communication highlight strategies that work.
New guidelines for health-care providers advise supporting every individual to achieve their best health, rather than focusing on weight status. (Shutterstock)

Are we over weight yet? New guidelines aim to reduce obesity stigma in health care

New Canadian clinical practice guidelines for obesity aim to help reduce the prevalence and impact of weight bias and stigma in clinical care, and also encourage the public to advocate for change.
You might feel terrible. But your runny nose, sore throat and aches are signs your body is fighting the flu virus. And that’s a good thing. from www.shutterstock.com

Sick with the flu? Here’s why you feel so bad

How can a tiny flu virus make you feel so bad, all over? Here’s what’s behind your high temperature, muscle aches and other flu symptoms.
A vaccine (toxoid) against diphtheria first became available in Toronto in 1926. Thanks to the work of the Toronto Diphtheria Committee, the city was diphtheria-free by 1940. (Shutterstock)

How to increase childhood vaccination rates

Toronto’s fight against diptheria teaches us the powerful impact of public health campaigns – in persuading parents to vaccinate their children.
A patient suffering from dengue fever lies in a hospital bed in Peshawar, Pakistan, in October. Cases of dengue fever – a painful mosquito-borne spread disease – have doubled every decade since 1990. Environmental health experts are pointing the finger at climate change. (AP Photo/Muhammad Sajjad)

Thank you for not driving: Climate change requires anti-smoking tactics

What if we treated climate change as a health problem rather than an environmental one? There are lessons to be learned from the successful public health campaigns against smoking.
Giving up alcohol for a month might help you feel better in the short term, but no-one knows if taking part in these campaigns promotes long-term healthy drinking habits. from www.shutterstock.com

Yes, alcohol awareness campaigns like Dry July can work, but not for everyone

Many of us might be tempted to give up alcohol for a month as part of a highly publicised campaign, like Dry July. But how successful are these campaigns and how do you measure any long-term benefits?
From one hand-held habit to another. Shutterstock

Can social media help you quit smoking?

Services like Facebook and YouTube may have the upper hand when it comes to getting people to give up cigarettes.

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