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Articles on Truth and Reconciliation in Canada

Displaying 1 - 20 of 28 articles

An upside down maple leaf is tucked behind a plaque as people gather on Parliament Hill in Ottawa at a rally to honour the lives lost to residential schools and demand justice for Indigenous peoples, on Canada Day, July 1, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Reconciliation and Residential Schools: Canadians need new stories to face a future better than what we inherited

Considering our relationships to stories about the past and looking at learning as a process of encounter can help Canadians to become better treaty partners.
Handprints are seen on the side of a truck riding in a convoy of truckers and other vehicles in support of the Tk'emlups te Secwepemc people after the remains of 215 children were discovered buried near the former Kamloops Indian Residential School, in Kamloops, B.C.. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

How Canada committed genocide against Indigenous Peoples, explained by the lawyer central to the determination

Ending the Canadian genocide of Indigenous peoples is a legal obligation, requiring honest, active decolonization. The lawyer who wrote the MMIWG’s inquiry’s legal analysis of genocide explains.
Margaret Swan, left, embraces Mariette Buckshot after she spoke during an Indian Day school litigation announcement in Ottawa, Tuesday, March 12, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Indian day school survivors are seeking truth and justice

Canada is accepting claims emerging from a settlement with survivors of Indian day schools, but there has yet to be a public inquiry. There is an urgent need to hold Canada accountable.
Rocks painted with the message “every child matters,” commemorate Orange Shirt Day, Sept. 30, about creating meaningful discussion about the effects of Residential Schools and their legacy. (Province of British Columbia/Flickr)

Racism contributes to poor attendance of Indigenous students in Alberta schools: New study

A study in one Alberta school board found racism contributes to poor attendance of on-reserve Indigenous students in public schools, despite educators not recognizing this as a barrier.
The Black Lives Matter demonstrations that took place across Canada during the pandemic showed that individual actions can make a difference. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

How to build a better Canada after COVID-19: The power of everyday actions can bring about change

We have seen our ability to act in alignment with public health measures during the pandemic. People’s everyday actions could also make a difference in addressing systemic injustice.
We need more positive Indigenous-settler alliances like the one with Shoal Lake 40 First Nation, which created 24 km Freedom Road to provide access to the Trans-Canada Highway. Here a teepee frame sits beside Shoal Lake. THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods

How the COVID-19 crisis calls us towards reconciliation

The COVID-19 pandemic crisis could represent an opportunity to live up to all the recent talk of reconciliation in Canada.
A butterfly and medicine garden planted by ‘Finding Flowers’ at Maloca Community Garden, York University, Toronto. (Dana Prieto)

How Wet’suwet’en butterflies offer lessons in resilience and resistance

Indigenous land stewardship, resource extraction and corporate interests remain critical issues to addressing large-scale environmental concerns such as pollinator loss in Canada and beyond.
Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs from left, Rob Alfred, John Ridsdale and Antoinette Austin, take part in a rally in Smithers, B.C., in January 2020 against the Coastal GasLink project. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

Coastal GasLink pipeline dispute is a nation-to-nation matter

Reconciliation cannot be achieved by the brute force of the RCMP or the self-interests of energy companies.
The keeper of hundreds of Kwakwaka’wakw songs, Kwaksistalla Wathl’thla (Clan Chief Adam Dick), chanting at a feast (qui’las) with Mayanilh (Dr. Daisy Sewid-Smith). (Bert Crowfoot)

Indigenous song keepers reveal traditional ecological knowledge in music

Ancestral Indigenous songs often encode territorial responsibilities and rights, such as in relationship with ‘lokiwey’ (coastal clam gardens) on the Pacific Northwest Coast.
Regional Chief Terry Teegee speaks to the press n Victoria on Oct. 24, 2019 after Premier John Horgan announced Indigenous human rights will be recognized in B.C. with new legislation . THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolit

B.C. takes historic steps towards the rights of Indigenous Peoples, but the hard work is yet to come

British Columbia recently introduced groundbreaking legislation to implement the rights of Indigenous Peoples. It’s impossible to overstate the importance of this historic achievement.
Memory can serve as a heavy reminder of the past. Indigenous people gather in Shubenacadie, N.S., in June 2008 to remember the residents of a former residential school and the abuses they suffered. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Mike Dembeck

The importance of personal memory on Remembrance Day

Memories can be powerful tools to address humanity’s most difficult political, sociological and environmental problems
Cancer rates are rising among Inuit and critical oncology specialists and treatments are often located in urban centres, thousands of kilometres away from remote communities in Inuit Nunangat. (Alex Hizaka)

An Inuit approach to cancer care promotes self-determination and reconciliation

A ‘shared decision-making’ model enables collaboration with Indigenous communities within Canada’s health-care system - to respond to TRC Calls to Action and address rising cancer rates.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is greeted by a crowd as he arrives to attend a community feast during a visit to Arctic Bay, Nunavut, in August 2019. Trudeau has said the relationship with Indigenous peoples is Canada’s most important, so why aren’t Indigenous issues getting much attention this campaign? THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Indigenous justice and reconciliation barely on the radar this Canadian election

Based on tweets written by 735 candidates from Canada’s five major political parties, Indigenous issues are not on the national radar this election campaign. That’s both strange and short-sighted.
The system of ‘birth alerts’ across Canada perpetuates the removal of children from Indigenous families begun by residential schools. Pictured here: a historical report on residential schools released by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

British Columbia’s ban on ‘birth alerts:’ A guiding light on the road to reconciliation

To make meaningful progress on the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s Calls to Action, all provinces and territories should promptly follow B.C. and ban discriminatory ‘birth alerts.’

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