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Articles on Women CEOs

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French-language advocates protest Air Canada’s chief executive Michael Rousseau’s inability to speak French in front of the airline’s head office during a demonstration in Montréal. The sign reads: “Rousseau Get Out.” THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Corporate leadership: Why the tone at the top has moral consequences

What CEOs say and how they say it are essential. Their words can set the tone at the top of the firm and have far-reaching repercussions.
Lack of resources and support for women entrepreneurs lowers their chances of success. But this problem can be partially overcome through crowdfunding initiatives by socially validating female-led ventures. (Shutterstock)

How women-led companies can raise more money through crowdfunding

Can social validation — specifically, the number of crowd-funding supporters — reduce the gender gap as companies helmed by women try to raise funds?
United States Vice-President-elect Kamala Harris speaks on Nov. 24, 2020, in Wilmington, Del. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The world needs more women leaders — during COVID-19 and beyond

Gender parity leads to collaboration and a blending of visions, and paves the way for the adoption of more comprehensive and inclusive solutions than if they’re conceived from only one perspective.
Women-focused capital financing is supposedly aimed at ending the corporate gender gap. But many equity investors, still largely high-net-worth men, still view women entrepreneurs as being deficient — and are practising what’s known as pinkwashing. (Shutterstock)

Do women-focused capital funds actually help women, or are they just ‘pinkwashing?’

Women-focused capital financing is supposedly aimed at ending the corporate gender gap. But many equity investors still view women entrepreneurs as being deficient and are practising pinkwashing.
Cathy Engelbert of Deloitte and Marillyn Hewson of Lockheed Martin are among the few female CEOs in corporate America. Reuters/Joshua Roberts

Why are there so few women CEOs?

Women occupy just 5% of the top jobs at companies in the S&P 500. Research shows the problem to be even worse.
Maria Ramos, pictured here at the 2009 World Economic Forum early in her tenure at ABSA. Copyright World Economic Forum www.weforum.org / Eric Miller emiller@iafrica.com [CC BY-SA 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

CEO’s exit underscores how few South African women hold top jobs

Several locally listed companies still have no female board members while most who do diversify their boards tend to appoint only one female director at a time.

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