Articles sur Australian literature

Affichage de 1 à 20 de 83 articles

Cynthia Banham with Kevin Rudd in 2008. Banham’s memoir explores both the trauma she experienced during a plane crash in 2007 and her family’s history. Dean Lewins/AAP

Inside the story: writing trauma in Cynthia Banham’s A Certain Light

In her fragmentary family memoir, Cynthia Banham interweaves narratives of war and migration with her own traumatic plane crash - ultimately reclaiming her identity in the process.
Man Out of Time is an affecting portrait of a family rocked by the patriarchal figure’s long-term depression. shutterstock

Inside the story: Man Out of Time and the inheritance of suffering

Stephanie Bishop's latest novel demonstrates a sophisticated approach to the relationship between time and narrative: novelists and aspiring writers would do well to look closely at her achievement.
A collection of essays, personal stories, pictures and poetry reflects on the challenges for women who speak out about assault in the age of #MeToo. Mihai Surdu/Shutterstock

Thirty-five voices, one movement: a new book examines #MeToo in Australia

A new anthology collects the voices of 35 contributors on #MeToo in Australia. The book wades into all the difficult areas, from sexual assault to the culture that enables it.
The beach is a common setting for Australian novels, which often capture its darker side. boxer_bob/flickr

Ten great Australian beach reads set at the beach

While tourism campaigns often portray the beach as an idyllic, isolated haven, many of our beach stories depict it as a darker, more complex place. Here are ten worth reading.
The Miles Franklin authors with their novels, clockwise from top left: Felicity Castagna, Eva Hornung, Kim Scott, Michelle de Kretser, Catherine McKinnon and Gerald Murnane. Courtesy Perpetual/ Copyright Agency/ Martin Ollman/Timothy Hillier. Eva Hornung image: Noni Martin.

Your guide to the Miles Franklin shortlist: a kaleidoscopic portrait of a diverse nation

For many years, the Miles Franklin award was a bastion of monoculture. But this year's stories are a diverse reflection of Australia.
Behrouz Boochani photographed on Manus Island. Jason Garman/Amnesty International via AAP

Truth to power: my time translating Behrouz Boochani’s masterpiece

Behrouz Boochani wrote his memoir of incarceration on Manus Island one text message at a time. Translating this work of 'horrific surrealism' from Farsi to English was a profoundly philosophical experience.
Guy Pearce as the Chandleresque private investigator Jack Irish: in the early years of Australian crime fiction, convicts and bushrangers featured prominently. Lachlan Moore

Friday essay: from convicts to contemporary convictions – 200 years of Australian crime fiction

Australia's rich tradition of crime fiction is little known – early tales told of bushrangers and convicts, one hero was a mining engineer turned amateur detective – but it reveals a range of national myths and fantasies.
Four of the six shortlisted books for the 2018 Stella Prize were from smaller presses, as was the winner, Alexis Wright’s Tracker. Stella Prize

Friday essay: the remarkable, prize-winning rise of our small publishers

As major publishers chase bestselling books, small ones are leading the way in publishing Australian literary fiction. And of late, they have been sweeping our major literary awards.

Les contributeurs les plus fréquents

Plus