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Articles on SARS-CoV-2

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SARS-CoV-2 turns on a cellular switch to build the tubes in this photo – called filopodia – that might help viral particles – the little spheres – spread more easily. Dr Elizabeth Fischer, NIAID NIH / Bouhaddou et al. Elsevier 2020

Coronavirus and cancer hijack the same parts in human cells to spread – and our team identified existing cancer drugs that could fight COVID-19

Kinases are cellular control switches. When they malfunction, they can cause cancer. The coronavirus hijacks these kinases to replicate, and cancer drugs that target them could fight COVID-19.
Chinese President Xi Jinping (right) shakes hands with French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian in Beijing on November 6, 2019. Also present is Élisabeth Borne, Minister of the Ecological and Inclusive Transition (left). Ludovic Marin/AFP

Covid-19: Lessons from China’s public diplomacy in the EU

China’s attempts to promote its actions and model of governance while discrediting the EU are not a short-term response to the pandemic, but part of a long-term strategy to build its international power.
Geoffrey McKillop (front) with his partner Nicola Dallet McConaghie as they left the hospital where he was discharged after surviving coronavirus. Liam McBurney/PA Images via Getty Images

What doctors know about lingering symptoms of coronavirus

Is it possible that people who recover from COVID-19 will be plagued with long term side effects from the infection? An infectious disease physician reviews the evidence so far.
Doctors reported the first cases of MIS-C in April. Learning more about how SARS-CoV-2 affects children is essential to the safe reopening of communities. (Pexels/August de Richelieu)

Rare multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children linked to coronavirus

A rare new disease syndrome appears to be caused by an overactive immune response in children, often hitting weeks after exposure to the SARS-CoV-2 virus.
Screening for symptoms can catch some cases of COVID-19, but about people who are infected but not showing any symptoms? AP Photo/John Raoux

Can people spread the coronavirus if they don’t have symptoms? 5 questions answered about asymptomatic COVID-19

There is a lot of confusion and concern around asymptomatic spread of SARS-C0V-2. An infectious disease expert explains how many people are asymptomatic and how they can spread the virus.
Breathing in through the nose is an integral part of meditation and delivers virus-fighting gases to the lungs. triloks / Getty Images

The right way to breathe during the coronavirus pandemic

The body has many natural defenses against viruses and other pathogens. One antiviral molecule produced in the body is nitric oxide and it is created when we breathe in through the nose.
Emergency hospital during influenza epidemic at Camp Funston in Kansas around 1918. National Museum of Health and Medicine

5 ways the world is better off dealing with a pandemic now than in 1918

A century ago, the influenza pandemic killed about 50 million people. Today we are battling the coronavirus pandemic. Are we any better off? Two social scientists share five reasons we have to be optimistic.
Coughing, sneezing, talking and even just breathing can produce airborne particles that can spread SARS-CoV-2. Stanislaw Pytel/Digital Vision via Getty Images

People are getting sick from coronavirus spreading through the air – and that’s a big challenge for reopening

SARS-CoV-2 can be spread through the air. But just how much of a factor that is has been hard to determine. Recent evidence suggests it is common, posing problems as public places begin to reopen.

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