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Artículos sobre Hydropower

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Maine’s Penobscot River flows freely where the Veazie Dam once stood. Dam removals have reopened the river to 12 native fish species. Gregory Rec/Portland Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

When dams cause more problems than they solve, removing them can pay off for people and nature

Thousands of dams across the US are aging and overdue for maintenance. Taking them down can revive rivers, restore fish runs and create new opportunities for tourism and outdoor activities.
Renewable energy being installed at a community in the Northern Territory. Researchers have predicted Australia’s emissions are set to fall, but warn the renewables deployment rate must continue. Lucy Hughes-Jones/AAP

Some good news for a change: Australia’s greenhouse gas emissions are set to fall

Australia’s renewables revolution proves that there’s cause for hope in our emissions reduction goals. But we cannot rest on our laurels.
The San Pedro Mezquital River is the last free-flowing river in Mexico’s western Sierra Madre. Octavio Aburto

Hydropower dams can harm coastal areas far downstream

Thousands of hydropower dams are under construction around the world. New research shows that by cutting off sediment flow, these dams can have big ecological effects on far-off bays and deltas.
These photovoltaics panels provide this village with energy now, but they could become obsolete when the main grid arrives. (Shutterstock)

The future of renewable infrastructure is uncertain without good planning

Small-scale renewable energy projects can power rural areas not connected to the main grid. But investors may hesitate if future electrification remains unpredictable.
After 48 hours of frantic effort, Brazilian rescue workers have called off their search for survivors at a collapsed dam in Minas Gerais state. AP Photo/Leo Correa

Dam collapse at Brazilian mine exposes grave safety problems

Nearly 1,800 Brazilian dams are at risk of failure, according to the government. Fixing them is expensive – but ignoring aging dams can have considerable social, economic and environmental costs.
Munduruku tribal people are demanding that Brazil’s government respect their land rights. AP Photo/Eraldo Peres

Amazon deforestation, already rising, may spike under Bolsonaro

Brazil’s new president could clear the way for plans to develop remote areas around the Tapajos River basin over the objections of the indigenous people who live there.
Survivors of the dam disaster take refuge at a temporary shelter in Laos’s Attapeu province. ABC Laos News/EPA

The Laos disaster reminds us that local people are too often victims of dam development

Images of the aftermath of the Xepian-Xe Nam Noy dam collapse in Laos went around the world. But many other dam projects harm locals and the environment in less visible ways.
Development is peaking in the high country between India and China. Vinay Vaars/Wikimedia Commons

China and India’s border dispute is a slow-moving environmental disaster

For decades, China and India have clashed over their disputed Himalayan border. This clash is also playing out via a development boom that threatens the health of one of the world’s biggest river catchments.

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