Articles on Paris

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Le Pont-Neuf et la Pompe de la Samaritaine, vue du quai de la Mégisserie, painting by Nicolas Raguenet (circa 1750-1760). Musée Carnavalet

Car-free Paris? It was already a dream in 1790

The debate over the place of cars in cities may seem recent, but pamphlets published during the French Revolution show that the battle was raging before the first automobile even saw the light of day.
City Skyline and Main River in Frankfurt, Germany. Valerian Alecsa / Shutterstock

New monetary policies: fuelling metropolisation and megalopolisation in Europe?

Economic polarisation across Europe is becoming an important phenomenon, in part driven by monetary policies that can increase office prices and can even affect the fundamentals that drive the markets.
New York City is one of the world’s most cosmopolitan cities, with 37 percent of its population foreign-born. Reuters/Eduardo Munoz

How cities help immigrants feel at home: 4 charts

A sociologist interviewed hundreds of immigrants in New York, Barcelona and Paris. Here's what they say those cities get right — and do wrong — when integrating foreign-born residents.
A protest in Toulouse in January 2016 against the state of emergency in France. Gyrostat/Wikimedia

The fight against terrorism: the rule of uncertainty?

Weakening the institutional as well as the symbolic functioning of the rule of law has the consequence of introducing new "risks", and thus creating more insecurity.
Paris “under water” and other European cities facing drastic climate change should trigger planners to think urban spaces differently. S.Faric/Flickr

When climate comes unhinged, we need to re-think how to build our cities

In the future, Europe will suffer from more heat waves as well as extreme rainfall, presenting new challenges for planners and health care services. Building resilient cities can help.
Helsinki s City Wall, a collaborative social space.

Productive cities: toward a new biopolitics of cities

With the rise of the knowledge-based economy, fab labs, maker spaces and more, cities are being transformed into production centres. This dynamic movement is ripe with promise, but also has risks.
The Hermès building in Tokyo, designed by Renzo Piano (Ginza 5, Chuo-ku, Tokyo). Naoya Fujii/Visual Hunt

Hermès: behind the scenes of the French luxury gem

Case analysis of Hermès and its four strengths: a real identity, the creativity and skills of its artisans, innovation, and the fact that it remains an independent family company.
‘Damenkneipe,’ or ‘Ladies’ Saloon,’ painted by Rudolf Schlichter in 1923. In 1937, many of his paintings were destroyed by the Nazis as ‘degenerate art.’

How the Nazis destroyed the first gay rights movement

The 1920s and early ‘30's looked like the beginning of the end for centuries of gay intolerance. Then came fascism and the Nazis.
A stroll through Sydney’s Marks Park and the nearby tourist attraction Sculptures by the Sea is a different experience if one knows the area’s brutal history. Leah-Anne Thompson from www.shutterstock.com

Psychogeography: a way to delve into the soul of a city

Wandering the city by foot helps us look beneath ordinary conceptions of the face value of a place to the meanings built up and lost over time.

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