Articles on COVID-19

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Bruce Aylward, team lead of the WHO-China joint mission on COVID-19, speaks to the media about COVID-19 after returning from China, on Feb. 25, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Keystone via AP, Salvatore Di Nolfi

The WHO’s risky communication strategy created confusion around COVID-19

The World Health Organization’s handling of communication around COVID-19 included ambiguous messaging that created confusion.
Sherry Brewer, a teacher at the Galloway Children’s Center, watches over children as they enjoy snacks after a pre-Fourth of July parade in Jackson, Mississippi, June 26, 2020. AP Photo/Rogilio V. Solis

A leading infectious disease expert explains how to be as safe as possible on this very different Fourth

This is the first Fourth of July in which Americans must deal with the coronavirus pandemic. One of the nation's premier infectious disease experts explains why it's important to take special care.
The first floating offshore wind turbine “floatgen” is pictured off La Turballe, western France on September 28 2018. Sebastien Salom Gomis/AFP

A green stimulus to boost the energy transition?

Can Europe's response to the Covid-19 health crisis put its economy on a greener path? To help answer this question, the recent GEM Energy Barometer polled around 100 energy experts in France.
Entomologist Brian Lovett examines flea beetle-infested potatoes in Morgantown, West Virginia. Matt Kasson

How to manage plant pests and diseases in your victory garden

The COVID-19 pandemic has boosted interest in home gardening. Three scientists who garden explain some basic methods for controlling common insects and microbes that can spoil your crop.
Situated on a plateau and surrounded by mountains, Mexico City – seen here in a haze on May 20, 2018 – is a ‘bowl’ that traps smog and dust. AP Photo/Marco Ugarte

Mexico City buried its rivers to prevent disease and unwittingly created a dry, polluted city where COVID-19 now thrives

The Aztecs had a shining city on a lake, with canals, causeways and aqueducts – until the Spanish came. Mexico City is still suffering the consequences of their bad public health decisions.
Pooling samples means one test can screen multiple people. Tetra Images via Getty Images

Group testing for coronavirus – called pooled testing – could be the fastest and cheapest way to increase screening nationwide

Screening multiple samples with a single test gets more people diagnosed using fewer supplies. Two health policy researchers explain how it works and how it could help the U.S.

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