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Articles on Cognitive function

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The cognitive difficulties that accompany mental health disorders can potentially lead to misdiagnoses and improper treatment. Elva Etienne/Moment via Getty Images

Mental health problems come with an added ‘cost’ of poorer cognitive function – a neuropsychologist explains

While only about 20% of people would qualify for a formal diagnosis of a mental disorder, more than 60% express symptoms of those disorders – and those symptoms can lead to cognitive difficulties.
People suffering from long-term effects of COVID-19 face uncertainty about the nature of their symptoms and how long they might last. Halfpoint Images/Moment via Getty Images

Deciphering the symptoms of long COVID-19 is slow and painstaking – for both sufferers and their physicians

Researchers are piecing together clues to better understand the puzzling array of symptoms in those who never seem to fully recover from COVID-19.
We’re still learning about the human brain. SpeedKingz/Shutterstock

Five amazing facts about your brain

Even though the brain controls virtually everything we do, we often know very little about it.
You might just be getting better at the game you’re practicing. Malcolm Lightbody/Unsplash

Are brain games mostly BS?

There are reasons to be skeptical, of both the quality of the evidence presented so far and the questionable assumptions that underlie claims of improved cognitive function after brain training.
If you engage in cognitively stimulating activities in midlife, such as reading and playing games, you can reduce dementia risk by about 26 per cent, according to research. (Unsplash/Rawpixel)

How to reduce your risks of dementia

Research is revealing many ways in which we can reduce our dementia risks – from eating a Mediterranean diet and exercising, to playing games and studying for degrees.
A new study funded by the Centre for Aging and Brain Health Innovation will investigate the use of learning technologies such as streaming media for people with dementia and those at risk. (Shutterstock)

Study hard and you might lower your chances of dementia

Higher education for seniors shows promise – for combatting social isolation, increasing well-being and delaying the onset, or slowing the progression, of dementia.

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