Articles on Physiology

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At a molecular level, stresses and strains can make your body clock break into a sprint. Lightspring/Shutterstock

Tick, tock… how stress speeds up your chromosomes’ ageing clock

Emerging evidence suggests that prolonged stress exposure can accelerate the ticking rate of an internal cellular clock. By doing so, stress can contribute to faster ageing and body deterioration.
Researchers imagine tapping into your body’s reactions to extreme cold to reap psychological benefits. Ratushniak/Shutterstock.com

Brain over body: Hacking the stress system to let your psychology influence your physiology

Can the brain’s conscious mechanisms exert a significant influence on the body’s autonomic functions? New research suggests yes – with possible implications for mental health.
Shrimp cocktail: Tasty to some, potentially deadly for others. Legoktm/Wikimedia

Shellfish allergies: can they be treated?

Alongside with milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, wheat, soybeans and fish, shellfish are one of the eight allergens that account for 90% of food-related allergic reactions. What if a vaccine could exist?
Eighty years ago, Seabiscuit trounced Triple Crown winner War Admiral. AP Photo

Can Seabiscuit’s DNA explain his elite racing ability?

The US went crazy for Seabiscuit when he won his famous 1938 match race against War Admiral. Now researchers are investigating the thoroughbred's DNA to see what made him such an unlikely success.
Dinosaurs had some bad luck, but sooner or later extinction comes for all of us. rawpixel/Unsplash.com

What makes some species more likely to go extinct?

Death is inevitable for individuals and also for species. With help from the fossil record, paleontologists are piecing together what might make one creature more vulnerable than another.
Australia’s Michael Shelley will run in the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games marathon. AAP

The science of elite long distance running

There are many factors that set elite runners apart from other runners, including training volume, physiology, tendon function and running technique.
Little does this woman know what happens to her brain when she licks the ice cream. from www.shutterstock.com

Health Check: does my brain really freeze when I eat ice cream?

It's a long, hot summer's day and you're looking forward to an ice cream. But within seconds of your first bite, you feel a headache coming on: a brain freeze. What's going on?
The physiological response to sex is similar to that of exercise. from shutterstock.com

Health Check: does sex count as exercise?

Sex can often be a pleasurable experience. But it also has benefits some reports have compared to those of exercise. So can sex really count as a workout?

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