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Articles on Hydropower

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The Seli’š Ksanka Qlispe’ Dam provides enough electricity for about 147,000 homes in the Flathead Indian Reservation in Montana. Martina Nolte via Wikimedia Commons

What is hydroelectric energy and how does it work?

How does flowing water make electricity? An engineer explains hydroelectric generation.
This direct air capture plant in Iceland was designed to capture 4,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide per year. Climeworks 2021 via AP Photos

How not to solve the climate change problem

A climate scientist looks at what works and some popular ideas that aren’t as cheap or effective as people hope.
The white ‘bathtub ring’ around Lake Mead, shown on Jan. 11, 2022, is roughly 160 feet high and reflects falling water levels. George Rose/Getty Images

What is dead pool? A water expert explains

The Colorado River provides water and electricity to 40 million people in the western US, but falling water levels threaten both of those resources.
Dalat, a region in the central highlands of Vietnam, is known for its fertile land and the fruits and vegetables that grow there. As a consequence, interest in the Department of Agriculture at the Dalat Vocational Training College is high. Laurent Weyl/Collectif Argos

Climate change in Vietnam: impacts and adaptation

Data analysis suggests local activity will intensify the effects of global warming - so adapting means rethinking national development strategies
The U.S. has thousands of lakes and reservoirs that could be paired for pumped hydro storage without the need for rivers. Ollo via Getty Images

Batteries get hyped, but pumped hydro provides the vast majority of long-term energy storage essential for renewable power – here’s how it works

A team of researchers found 35,000 pairs of existing reservoirs, lakes and old mines in the US that could be turned into long-term energy storage – and they don’t need dams on rivers.
Maine’s Penobscot River flows freely where the Veazie Dam once stood. Dam removals have reopened the river to 12 native fish species. Gregory Rec/Portland Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

When dams cause more problems than they solve, removing them can pay off for people and nature

Thousands of dams across the US are aging and overdue for maintenance. Taking them down can revive rivers, restore fish runs and create new opportunities for tourism and outdoor activities.

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