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Articles on Work-life balance

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About one-third of Canada’s workforce are also caregivers, most often to aging parents or parents-in-law. (Shutterstock)

COVID-19’s silver lining? Creating a caregiver-friendly work culture

Changes to working life created by COVID-19 give employers an opportunity to embrace a caregiver-friendly work culture, supporting the millions of Canadians who juggle employment and informal caring.
While Canadian moms are still doing the lion’s share of child care and housework, in the early days of the pandemic, Canadian dads stepped up their efforts. (Shutterstock)

Canadian dads are doing more at home than before the coronavirus pandemic

Canadian fathers increased their share of work at home — in housework and in child care — in the early days of the pandemic as work and routines put pressures on the family.
Women internalized their role as caregivers so much so that, more often than not, the question of “whose work is getting priority in your couple?” is never even asked. Shutterstock

As lockdown ends, women executives are also at the end of their rope

Caught between the educational care of children and a considerable amount of full-time work to be done, women managers continue to shoulder a large part of the domestic and parental burden.
New Zealand prime minister Jacinda Ardern speaks at the country’s Parliament on June 8, 2020. New Zealand reported no active Covid-19 cases after the country’s final patient was given the all clear and released from isolation, health authorities said on June 8. Marty Melville/AFP

Women’s careers in the time of coronavirus

The Covid-19 pandemic has hit women hard, in particular amplifying gender gaps. Yet women have also proved that their contributions – on the front lines and leadership positions – are invaluable.
Working from home isn’t an option for low-income employees and primarily benefits those who make more money — and save more money as a result. (Alizee Baudez/Unsplash)

Remote work worsens inequality by mostly helping high-income earners

The higher a person's salary, the most likely they are to be able to work from home; it's not an option for most low-income workers. Here's what governments can do to help encourage more remote work.

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