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Articles on Customers

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The authors didn’t examine diners’ perceptions of polka-dot masks specifically. AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu

Yes, customers do like it when waiters and hairdressers wear a mask – especially if it’s black

The positive reaction to service workers wearing masks varied by region, with those in the West on the high end and people in the Midwest at the low end.
A boutique owner in Montréal arranges clothes at her store on May 24, 2020 as she prepares to reopen amid the COVID-19 pandemic. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Coronavirus recovery: Small businesses must focus on easing employee, customer fears

As small businesses reopen, they’ll need to engage the hearts and minds of both employees and customers by recognizing that they feel emotions differently than they did before COVID-19.
Aeroplan’s recent survey on consumer habits became a scandal for the company after people complained the questions normalized intolerant attitudes about immigration and male dominance over women. (Shutterstock)

Aeroplan’s troublesome ‘purity of the country’ survey is nothing new

The recent Aeroplan survey offended many consumers with questions they felt normalized intolerant views. But consumer research has a long history of learning about customers’ values.
Customer-facing roles may soon be taken over by cheaper, friendlier and more knowledgeable robotic retail assistants. Thomas Peter/Reuters

Business Briefing: when robots and customers meet

Business Briefing: when robots and customers meet The Conversation17.8 MB (download)
Customers might prefer digital robots who don't judge for now but physical robots with empathy may be the customer service workers of the future.
The ACCC has blocked the big four banks from bargaining with Apple for more control over Apple Pay. Damir Sagolj/Reuters

ACCC rejects the banks colluding to bargain on Apple Pay

The banks could have used their collective bargaining power not only against Apple for Apple Pay but also stall the adoption of mobile payments in Australia.
“Cooling-off” periods for purchases made in high-pressure selling situations like door-to-door sales don’t help consumers, research shows. image from shutterstock.com

Cooling-off periods for consumers don’t work: study

Customers who make purchases under pressure don’t use the usual 10-day cooling-off period given under law, new research finds.
Joking around with customers can improve satisfaction, as long as its the right jokes! Zeetz Jones/Flickr

Business Briefing: being funny with customers

Business Briefing: being funny with customers. The Conversation16.2 MB (download)
New research shows that humour can relieve tension for employees and increase customer satisfaction, just don't make jokes when it comes to offering apologies!

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