Articles on Ageing population

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As the dream of home ownership eludes more and more older Australians, this has big implications for retirement, pensions and government spending on rental assistance. Billion Photos/Shutterstock

When falling home ownership and ageing baby boomers collide

Until now most people have eventually owned a home. But two trends – falling ownership and a growing aged population – will put the budgets of retirees and government under real pressure.
For decades, doctors have been prescribing low-dose aspirin for healthy people over the age of 70. from shutterstock.com

Daily low-dose aspirin doesn’t reduce heart-attack risk in healthy people

Taking low-dose aspirin daily doesn't delay the onset of disability in healthy older people. Nor does it prevent heart attack or stroke in those who hadn't experienced either condition before.
Cutting immigration to Australia will impact the country’s demographic composition, with consequences for the working age population and income tax base. Andrew Seaman/Unsplash

Migration helps balance our ageing population – we don’t need a moratorium

Politicians across the spectrum have at some point targeted immigration as a contributor to out-of-control population growth. But would reducing, or banning, immigration take pressure off cities?
Mandatory retirement ages are still in place for the Australian judiciary. But this practice may be out of step with contemporary workforce needs. Dave Hunt/AAP

Why mandatory retirement ages should be a thing of the past

Mandatory retirement ages are mostly a thing of the past in Australia. Removing the last vestiges of this practice is one way to address the problem of Australia's ageing workforce.
When an ageing person is forced to move out of their family home, that can trigger a host of problems that policy is doing little to prevent. Diego Cervo/Shutterstock

For Australians to have the choice of growing old at home, here is what needs to change

Millions of older Australians live in houses that don't safely meet their needs, but they're not ready for a nursing home. Lack of suitable housing and the moving costs leave them with nowhere to go.
Tasmania’s ageing population matters because as people get older they become more reliant on the services provided by governments (for example pensions, health and aged care). Dave Hunt/AAP

Tasmania can’t only rely on a growing population for an economic boost

Population growth for growth’s sake (as a proxy for economic growth), without consideration for the demands this creates might actually compromise Tasmania's economy.
In Nagoro, in Tokushima Prefecture, one resident has made around 300 dolls to replace villagers who are no longer around. Roberto Maxwell/flickr

When a country’s towns and villages face extinction

Across Japan, towns and villages are vanishing as the population ages and young people move to the cities. How the country manages this holds lessons for other developed nations facing a similar fate.
The ageing population is one factor in increasing numbers of people living alone, and innovative and inclusive responses are needed. shutterstock

We are living alone together in today’s cities – and that calls for smart and ‘bolshie’ moves

Living and dying alone presents many challenges for cities, and we'll need more than technology to meet these. Only an inclusive, innovative response can deliver the essential element of human care.
Staying physically active can play a big part in ageing well – and a well-designed neighbourhood helps with that. Maylat/shutterstock

Eight simple changes to our neighbourhoods can help us age well

Our ageing population presents several social and economic challenges, particularly for the health sector. Physical activity can tackle many of these.
Adelaide’s aims in becoming a smart city include better traffic flows and highly co-ordinated transport networks. moisseyev/iStock by Getty Images

Lessons from Adelaide in how a smart city can work to benefit everyone

Smart city thinking makes good use of rapidly developing technology to help make cities work better, easier-to-navigate, safer, healthier and more enjoyable places to live.
Australian governments of all persuasions have shared three common beliefs about the economic value of home ownership in later life. shutterstock

Three reasons the government promotes home ownership for older Australians

The promotion of home ownership as a way of funding care in later life is part of a broader policy trend toward making people individually responsible for the opportunities they have.
Despite expert recommendations to adopt a population policy, Australian governments continue to resist. Scott Cresswell/flickr

Australia doesn’t have a population policy – why?

Considering all the aspects of life in Australia that are affected by population, it's remarkable that the nation doesn't have a national policy on it.
Simple features, like a thoughtfully sited bench, can make a big difference to older people’s ability to enjoy public spaces in the city. alexkich from www.shutterstock.com

Contested spaces: we need to see public space through older eyes too

Several key aspects of public open space can encourage older people to get out and about. And badly designed and maintained facilities have the opposite effect and can harm their wellbeing.

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