Articles on Indigenous health

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Like so many Indigenous people in the NT, Dr G. Yunupingu had chronic hepatitis B since he was a child. DAN HIMBRECHTS/AAP

Dr G. Yunupingu’s legacy: it’s time to get rid of chronic hepatitis B in Indigenous Australia

Hepatitis B rates in Indigenous communities are ten times higher than the rest of Australia. Eliminating the infection from Indigenous Australia can make a significant contribution to closing the gap.
Some of the notable additions to the PBS include drugs to treat eye and HIV infections, cystic fibrosis, multiple sclerosis, and cancer. from shutterstock.com

New drugs on the PBS: what they do and why we need them

An independent expert provides his pick of the most notable drugs added to the PBS on May 1, 2017.
Tony Abbott’s additional target focusing on school attendance rates has not improved at all since 2014. Neda Vanovac/AAP

Closing the Gap is failing and needs a radical overhaul

The report focus on the government’s own policies fails to acknowledge genuine differences of opinion on key issues such as constitutional recognition and income management.
The latest snapshot of Australian health funding reveals who’s footing the bill, among other worrying health statistics. from www.shutterstock.com

Sobering health stats in latest Productivity Commission report

The latest Productivity Commission health report reveals some serious problems with out-of-pocket health expenses as well as disparities between Indigenous and non-Indigenous health.
Students ponder the meaning of Jinamoom by Peggy Griffiths at the Ian Potter Museum of Art. Jodie Hutchinson/Ian Potter Museum

Friday essay: can looking at art make for better doctors?

Can empathy be taught to students in the healthcare professions? A groundbreaking project is using visual art to ensure they pay attention to the whole person, not just the disease.
The facilities were poor and some inmates were subjected to unsuccessful experimentation with a “vaccine” that used arsenic compounds. Hospital Ward Dorre Island/State library of Western Australia

What do the newspapers really tell us about the lock hospital histories?

The lock hospitals inflicted incalculable traumas on Aboriginal people, wrenching them away from families and country.
In the SBS documentary series Who Do You Think You Are?, Peter Garrett traces the history of his grandmother, who worked in the “lock hospitals” as a nurse. Screenshot/Who Do You Think You Are/ SBS

Acknowledge the brutal history of Indigenous health care – for healing

Hundreds of Aboriginal people were incarcerated on Dorre and Bernier islands for "venereal disease" between 1908 and 1919. The lock hospitals were penal rather than therapeutic institutions.
Indigenous Australians in the Northern Territory are more than 100 times as likely to have rheumatic heart disease than their non-Indigenous counterparts. Screenshot/Take Heart - Strep: Group A Streptococcal Infection

Why are Aboriginal children still dying from rheumatic heart disease?

Rheumatic heart disease is responsible for the highest gap in life expectancy between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians; higher than diabetes or kidney failure.
Trachoma disappeared from most of Australia 100 years ago as individual and community hygiene improved.

Why is trachoma blinding Aboriginal children when mainstream Australia eliminated it 100 years ago?

Trachoma easily spreads from one child to another through infected eye and nose secretions. A person may have up to 40 episodes of reinfection during childhood.

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