Menu Close
In this episode, Roberta Timothy talks about her new international health project, Black Health Matters, and explains why racial justice is a public health issue. In this photo, Dr. Janice Bacon, a primary care physician with Central Mississippi Health Services, gives Jeremiah Young, 11, a physical exam. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

🎧 Don't Call Me Resilient

Black health matters: Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 5

People protesting the gang rape and killing of a woman in Hathras, Uttar Pradesh, hold onto each other as policemen try to detain them in New Delhi, India, in September 2020. The gang rape of the woman from the lowest rung of India’s caste system sparked outrage across the country. (AP Photo/Altaf Qadri)

India: Gang rape exposes caste violence and limits of Me Too

Iran’s President Hassan Rouhani arrives for a news conference in Tehran, Iran, in February 2020, with a portrait of the Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei hanging on the wall behind him. Both men have signalled an interest in a new nuclear deal. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi)

Iran signals interest in nuclear deal, but U.S. must act soon

Digital health technology, such as electronic health records, is believed to enhance patient-centred care, improve integrated care and ensure financially sustainable health care. (Shutterstock)

Ontario’s digital health program has a data problem

Digital health can improve care, but in Ontario, health data are still fragmented, despite billions of dollars spent over the last two decades to enable fast and secure exchange of health information.
In this episode, Roberta Timothy explains why racial justice is a public health issue and talks about why she believes historical scientific racism needs to be addressed. Dr. David Tom Cooke, of UC Davis Health, participated in Pfizer’s clinical trial as part of an effort to reduce skepticism about the COVID-19 vaccine. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

🎧 Don't Call Me Resilient

Black health matters: Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 5 transcript

Transcript of Don't Call Me Resilient, Episode 5: Black health matters
Bill C-7 seeks to expand access to medical assistance in dying (MAID) to people who are not terminally ill, including those who suffer solely from mental illness. (Pixabay)

MAID for mental illness ignores safeguards for vulnerable people

The fundamental underpinning of all MAID requests is supposed to be the presence of an incurable medical condition, but it's not possible to predict that a mental illness will not improve.
A guest looks out from a Sheraton hotel window in Mississauga, Ont., on Feb. 22, 2021, as new air travel rules come into effect in Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Cole Burston

COVID-19 hotel quarantine and confusing exemptions

Canadian government travel restrictions are an attempt to curb the spread of COVID-19 variants. But vague language around exemptions for medical travel may confuse the physicians who can grant them.
The plastic problem isn’t separate from climate change. (Shutterstock)

Why plastic is part of the carbon cycle

Plastic has become a major part of the carbon cycle, a discovery that has implications for how we tackle climate change.
A man is arrested during a protest against Hong Kong’s National Security Law in July 2020. Miguel Candela/EPA

🎧 The Conversation Weekly

Leaving Hong Kong after China’s clampdown

Plus new research finds a way to speed up the search for dark matter. Listen to episode 4 of The Conversation Weekly.
Digitizing archives can make information more accessible, especially during the coronavirus pandemic. (Shutterstock)

Digital archives: Balancing access and privacy

During the coronavirus pandemic, digitizing archives can help increase access. But in addition to the labour and financial costs, issues of privacy, copyright and resources need to be considered.
Temporary migrant workers in Canada are facing COVID-19 while dealing with an immigration system that leaves them vulnerable. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Christopher Katsarov

🎧 Don't Call Me Resilient

Migrant workers urgently need permanent status

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought further suffering to migrant workers in Canada already experiencing the abuses of discriminatory immigration policies and poor working conditions.
Employees are often reluctant to speak up at work. But if they make efforts to research their ideas and ensure they benefit the organization, it benefits both workers and employers. (Unsplash)

Why employees hesitate to speak up at work

Studies consistently show that many employees are reluctant to speak up at work, and are even hardwired to remain silent. How can we help people voice their opinions more effectively?
Simply making an effort to consider the person behind the mask can help address the biases exacerbated by wearing one. (Shutterstock)

Face masks hide our facial expressions and can exacerbate racial bias

Wearing face masks hides our facial expressions and affects our social interactions. They make it harder for us to read facial expressions and can contribute to racist perceptions.
Once they turn 18, youth in foster care are required to fend for themselves. This includes finding shelter and services. (Shutterstock)

Youth forced out of foster care more vulnerable from COVID-19

The Ontario provincial government announced a moratorium on ending foster care at age 18 during the coronavirus pandemic, but this is due to end on March 31.
Water rushes through the Carillon Hydro electric dam in Québec. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Invest in ‘macrogrids’ for greener, more reliable electricity

The electricity sector is expected to play a key role in Canada's push to net-zero emissions. Enhancing long-distance transmission can be lower the cost of providing clean and reliable electricity.
U.S. President Joe Biden speaks after holding a virtual meeting with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, in the East Room of the White House on Feb. 23, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Biden-Trudeau meeting caps 250 years of Canada-U.S. relations

Many Canadians see it as positive that Joe Biden's first meeting, albeit virtually, was with Justin Trudeau. Nonetheless, Canadians have learned over two centuries to be wary about their neighbour.
In this July 2020 photo, former president Donald Trump stands at the Mount Rushmore National Memorial in South Dakota. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Trump and the post-White House lives of his predecessors

As Donald Trump prepares to address the Conservative Political Action Conference, known as CPAC, here's how other former presidents have occupied their time after leaving the White House.

Editor's Picks